Escape The Winter Trip 2020: Day 9

First things first, it was GROUNDHOG DAY! From what we gathered, the hog didn’t see his shadow when they pulled him from his hole. Good for us, kinda shitty for him, because he was probably sleeping… I also think that Groundhog Day is one of Josh’s least favorite days. Probably because I like to celebrate for any reason and he gets stuck on the “it’s the same thing…6 more weeks of winter and 6 weeks until spring” thing. At any rate, I like to give the fat hog the credit that he’s due on his day. So, happy Groundhog day!

Last post, I explained that our photos of fish, underwater critters and coralscapes had been decreasing as Josh’s underwater-bubble-ring proficiency was increasing but that’s about to change! Today Josh FINALLY decided that he would take the Olympus TG5 out for a spin and ended up falling in love with it. That’s FANTASTIC for a few reasons…(1) I wasn’t using it as much as I had hoped and it was really expensive; (2) no more tiny air bubbles clouding the cameras ability to capture things; and (3) we can share the really awesome photos that Josh is taking or our underwater adventures! I’m not sure the GoPro took another dip into the water after Josh started using the TG5 today, actually. From here on out, our posts from Bonaire will be really photo heavy!

We started the morning with accompanying the new crew of divers on their checkout dive at 18th Palm this morning and then ended up diving there all day, since we already had a ton of tanks set that we needed to use up. I found that I really like diving with Jon and Josh when they’re taking pictures because the dives are really long (1 hour+) but a really slow pace, giving us all the time to check out the little tiny stuff that we may have passed by if we were moving more quickly. Feast your eyes open these pretty awesome shots that Josh captured with the TG5 today…

Scrawled Filefish.
Whitespotted Filefish – orange variation – (left) and Scrawled Filefish (right).
This life is freaking AWESOME!
Blue Runner.
Christmas Tree Worm.
Christmas Tree Worm.
Christmas Tree Worms on coral.
Coralscape.
Spotted Scorpionfish (Alexis’s FAVORITE!)
Spotted Scorpionfish, resting on a coral head.
Coney Grouper and Spotted Moray Eel, freeswimming.
Threespot Damselfish.
Fairy Basslet.
Azure Vase Sponge.
Azure Vase Sponge.
Honeycomb Cowfish.
Barracuda, lurking.
Smooth Trunkfish.
Christmas Tree Worm.
Christmas Tree Worm.
Christmas Tree Worm and juvenile Threespot Damselfish, standing watch.
Christmas Tree Worm.
Schoolmaster Snapper.
Hey…are you taking pictures of all this cool stuff?!
Sand Diver.
Princess Parrotfish.
Banded Butterflyfish. Butterflyfish travel in small schools, although many are solitary until they find a partner, with whom they may mate for life.
Up close and personal with a Honeycomb Cowfish.
Smooth Trunkfish.
Coney Grouper.
Christmas Tree Worms on coral.
Smooth trunkfish.
Coney Grouper.
Foureye Butterflyfish.
Smallmouth Grunt.
Honeycomb Cowfish.
Everything’s okay over here!
Graysby Grouper.
Christmas Tree Worms on coral.
French Angelfish.
Taking it all in…
Christmas Tree Worm.
Up close and personal with a Foureye Butterflyfish.
Peaacock Flounder, swimming along.
Peacock Flounder doing it’s best to disguise itself while resting.
Christmas Tree Worm.
Sharptail Eel.
Schoolmaster Snapper.
Coney Grouper.
Adult Stoplight Parrotfish.

And just a couple videos to round out the day’s excitement!

Smooth Trunkfish.
Spotfin Burrfish.

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